How is radiocarbon dating used


09-Jan-2020 12:55

This dramatically improves accuracy, and reduces the amount of carbon required from about 10 grams to only a few milligrams.

In recent years, dating methods based on cosmogenic isotopes other than carbon (such as beryllium-10 and chlorine-36) have been developed, which allow for the dating of a wider variety of objects over much longer time scales.

On April 26, 2007 this facility celebrated 25 years of operation, during which time it had processed over 75,000 radiocarbon measurements on objects ranging from the Dead Sea Scrolls to the Shroud of Turin.

In this process, nitrogen-14 (7 protons and 7 neutrons) gains a neutron and loses a proton, producing carbon-14 (6 protons and 8 neutrons).

Radiocarbon dating—also known as carbon-14 dating—is a technique used by archaeologists and historians to determine the age of organic material.